Tag Archives: Social Innovation

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION SURVEY

The following survey was created for Sunnybrook Foundation to use in conjunction with its ‘People and Culture’ Survey that was deployed in winter 2018. The following survey is to understand the makeup of the Foundation – including visible and invisible minorities. The goal is to share the results of this survey at a future staff meeting and to inform the formation of a Diversity & Inclusion Committee.

PART A: Diversity and Inclusion Demographic Profile Survey

The following survey is to help us create a profile of our current workforce by collecting demographic information on your ethnic and cultural backgrounds, religious or spiritual affiliations and sexual orientation. The demographic information and the questions on diversity and inclusion will provide further insight on our current workface and will assist with developing diversity plans that promote inclusiveness and recognize the unique perspectives and contributions of all our staff. The feedback will assist in maintaining a workplace that is healthy, safe and inclusive for all.

These questions are personal to each individual, however we kindly as that you be honest in your responses so that we may recognize our strengths, areas of development, and to discover initiatives that will direct a human equity strategy. Responses are strictly confidential and anonymous. You may skip any questions you prefer not to answer.

The survey should take no longer than 5 minutes to complete.

1. Gender

  1. Female/Woman
  2. Male/Man
  3. Trans-identified
  4. Genderqueer/Gender nonconforming
  5. Other gender identity
  6. Prefer not to disclose

2. Please select from the following list the categories that best describe your racial and/or cultural group(s):

  1. White
  2. Chinese
  3. South Asian (East Indian, Pakistani, Sri Lankan, etc.)
  4. Black
  5. Filipino
  6. Latin American
  7. Southeast Asian (Vietnamese, Cambodian, etc.)
  8. Arab
  9. West Asian (Iranian, Afghan, etc.)
  10. Japanese
  11. Korean
  12. Indigenous (First Nations, Metis, or Inuit)
  13. Other
  14. Do Not Know
  15. Prefer not to disclose

3. What is your sexual orientation?

  1. Bisexual
  2. Gay
  3. Heterosexual
  4. Lesbian
  5. Queer
  6. Two-spirit
  7. Other
  8. Do not know
  9. Prefer not to disclose

4. What is your religious or spiritual affiliation?

  1. No religion (including Agnostic, Atheist)
  2. Roman Catholic
  3. Ukrainian Catholic
  4. United Church
  5. Anglican (Church of England, Episcopalian)
  6. Baptist
  7. Lutheran
  8. Pentecostal
  9. Presbyterian
  10. Mennonite
  11. Jehovah’s Witnesses
  12. Greek Orthodox
  13. Jewish
  14. Islam (Muslim)
  15. Buddhist
  16. Hindu
  17. Sikh
  18. Do not know
  19. Prefer not to disclose
  20. Other
  21. Please specify

5. Do you consider yourself to be a person with a disability?

  1. Yes
  2. No

PART B: Diversity and Inclusion Culture Survey

The Foundation aims to understand, assess and further enhance organizational culture. One of the key strategic initiatives is to promote and foster a culture of diversity and inclusion. This will enable us to continue to attract and retain talent and ensure we have an inclusive environment that inspire people to excel, innovate and grow. In order to understand where we are at and where we need to go, we are requesting your feedback and perceptions about our current state of diversity and inclusion.

The survey should take no longer than 10 minutes to complete.

1. Please state your department.

  1. Events
  2. Major Gifts
  3. Gift Processing
  4. Finance
  5. Marketing & Communications
  6. Community Giving (Monthly, Annual, Leadership)
  7. Stewardship

2. Please select your role (or the one that best describes the nature of your responsibilities).

  1. Associate/Co-ordinator
  2. Officer
  3. Manager
  4. Director
  5. AVP/VP
  6. Executive Office

3. The Foundation shows respect for a diverse range of opinions, ideas and people.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

4. The Foundation is committed to providing all employees with equal opportunities in the workplace.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

5. I believe the Foundation recognizes the contribution of all employees who excel at their jobs, regardless of their backgrounds.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

6. My personal characteristics do not influence performance decisions.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

7. My personal characteristics do not influence pay decisions.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

8. I believe that personal characteristics do not hinder or help an individual’s career progression or development opportunities.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

9. Ethnic and cultural preferences of staff are accommodated through time off for religious observances/holiday

  1. Yes
  2. No

10. The Foundation provides the flexibility needed for work-life balance.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

11. The Foundation has family-friendly policies in place.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

12. There are well-developed mechanisms to handle an employee complaint about harassment and discrimination.

  1. Strongly disagree
  2. Disagree
  3. Neutral
  4. Agree
  5. Strongly agree

13. If the Foundation could make one change to strengthen diversity and inclusion within the organization, what would you suggest?

FIVE THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN SETTING UP A DIVERSITY & INCLUSION COMMITTEE

The following key points are important to consider when setting up a Diversity & Inclusion Committee. Diversity is a reality in all of our work and bring unique perspectives to our organization.

1. Visible and invisible diversity

Representation on the committee, beyond identifying based on gender, race/ethnicity, and age is important. Consider employing a survey to allow individuals to self-identify to understand the true landscape and demographic of your organization. Representation includes, but is not limited to:

  • Gender
  • Indigeneity
  • Ethnicity/Race
  • Age
  • Power and position (social/administrative/economic/other)
  • Disability
  • Sexuality

2. Representation – avoid tokenism

Consider a range of professional experiences and life experiences – invitations, grounded in respect for both professional knowledge and life experience, are less likely to be felt as token representation. Invite participants with both diversity knowledge and identity-linked perspective that relate to the goals of the committee rather than just their identity.

3. Create a safe space for contribution

A strong introduction to allow everyone to share their own perspectives and lived experiences, as well ground rules to participation is important to ensure a safe space has been created. Employees with ‘less power’ might fear repercussions for not agreeing with a majority perspective. It is therefore important to consider and attended to the group dynamics. When setting up the committee, it is also important to consider and assess any participation-related needs and/or access barriers.

4. Voting – an unpressured decision-making tool

Consensus can be challenging when everyone has diverse experiences and perspectives. Whenever appropriate, voting by secret ballot can allow participants to influence the direction of the group without having to publicly stating their opinion or views on a topic.

5. Leadership – include a decision maker at the table

To ensure that the ideas and goals of the committee can move forward in a meaningful way and within the bounds of the organization, include an individual that is a ‘decision maker’. They are your ally at the leadership level that can advocate and move forward the mandate of the D&I committee.

What’s Your Legacy?

Is it ending poverty in Canada? Or helping newcomers find meaningful employment, or ensuring that all children have access to healthy food? My legacy wish is to be a catalyst in my community to spark collaboration across sectors with a shared vision to solve each of these super complex issues. My wish is to no longer have to sponsor a fundraising stair climb, or host a food bank drive, but to shift entire systems to empower residents in my community to be architects of their own solutions.

That’s where the principles behind social innovation including social entrepreneurship can play an instrumental role in our communities. “Social Innovation refers to initiatives, products or processes, that profoundly change the beliefs, behavior, cultures, power dynamics, basic routines and / or access to resources of any social system in the direction of greater equity, productivity and resilience. Successful social innovations have impact, scale and durability.”(1)

“Social entrepreneurs are relentless team-builders and problem solvers who set new norms in their fields of work. They are practical visionaries – practical in that they are highly attentive to the nuts and bolts of making things work, and visionary in that they often reframe the problem, build roles for others to participate, and cast a long term view for change at least at the national level.”(2)

To help illustrate this definition, Ashoka founder, Bill Drayton, refers to the following analogy – to give a man a fish, you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime. Well social innovation changes that conversation to, you give a man a fish, well that’s good; you teach a man how to fish – that’s a little better; revolutionizing the fishing industry – now that’s where real leverage comes in. His philosophy believes that we need entrepreneurs just as much in business as we do working on social issues.(3)

In a recent report released by KPMG Canada and Social Innovation Generation, entitled Breaking Through: How Corporate Social Innovation Creates Business Opportunity, it states that “in Canada, our natural environment, economy and society are confronting challenges such as:

  • accelerated climate change,
  • an aging population, and
  • the requirement for substantial investment in infrastructure.

New forms of innovation are required to shift progress to overcome these issues and build a new economic operating system that will strengthen Canada’s resiliency.”(4) We now know that the charitable sector alone cannot solve some of Canada’s most pressing issues. We need thought leadership and great minds from all sectors to come to the design table with their diverse and inclusive set of talents, expertise, and innovative problem solving skills to work with communities striving for economic and social prosperity.

Social innovation provides a platform to unlock value across an entire system and incorporates an entrepreneurial spirit, strategic corporate partnership, smart philanthropic investment, new market opportunities and policy changes to foster an interconnectedness among stakeholders striving towards a shared vision. With the introduction of these new solutions into communities, it’s also instrumental to help build capacity from within. By combining capacity building with strategic resources, communities will be able to address old problems in a new way.

As an AFP Inclusion and Philanthropy Fellow, I believe that as the next generation of leaders in fundraising, we need to understand that social innovation is not a trend, nor is it a new shiny object for charities to invest in. It’s not about galas, cheque presentations, or sexy social media fundraising campaigns. It’s not about a handout, or even a hand up, but rather it’s about a fundamental shift in how we build communities that utilize inclusive job creation mechanisms, build on local talents and expertise, increase asset ownership, achieve local environmental goals, and strive for local economic stability.(5)

It’s a profoundly different operating model where the path forward is anchored in community resiliency and overall community wealth building.

…so what’s your legacy going to be?

 

References:

  1. http://www.sigeneration.ca/home/resources/primer/
  2. http://usa.ashoka.org/about-ashoka-united-states
  3. http://usa.ashoka.org/social-entrepreneurs-are-not-content-just-give-fish-or-teach-how-fish
  4. https://www.kpmg.com/Ca/en/IssuesAndInsights/ArticlesPublications/Documents/5441-KPMG-Social-Innovation-Report-FY14-web-Final.pdf
  5. http://community-wealth.org/content/what-community-wealth-building-why-it-so-important